CFP: CRIME AND DETECTION IN 18th- AND 19th-CENTURY BRITAIN

CFP: CRIME AND DETECTION IN 18th- AND 19th-CENTURY BRITAIN

The 6th Warsaw Literary Meeting – – – I-DAY WORKSHOP

DATE: 19 May 2017

COORDINATOR: Dr Lucyna Krawczyk-Żywko, University of Warsaw

 DEADLINES:

The 19th century is described as the time of sensational crimes, (developing) police detection, and “the ascent of the detective” (Shpayer-Makov); it is also the period when crime and its investigation were offered as entertainment on a mass scale in penny dreadfuls, shilling shockers, sensation fiction, and daily papers. However, it is the 18th century that witnessed the beginnings of the attempts at organising official crime prevention (with Henry Fielding, a writer and a London magistrate, as the man behind it), and Victorian detective and sensational fiction have its roots in 18th-century gothic tales and The Newgate Calendar.

We invite scholars working in various disciplines and fields of study to discuss the ways in which they perceive historic and fictional crime and detection across media and centuries.

SUGGESTED TOPICS & THEMES:

  • Night Watch, thief-takers, Bow Street Runners,

‘bobbies’ and plainclothes policemen

  • The Metropolitan Police and/vs local police forces
  • the ways and means of detection
  • the ‘gentleman detective’ and the ‘gentleman criminal’
  • fictional female detectives’ exploits
  • class, gender, and race in detective stories
  • crime in London and in the regions; railway crimes; penal colonies
  • the spectacle of crime: public executions, crime and detection on stage
  • narrating crime in literature and the press
  • adapting and appropriating 18th- and 19th- century criminals and detectives
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